freedom

On behalf of the 570th man on Manus Island

Dear Prime Minister,

How does locking up the poet and humanitarian Abdul Aziz Muhamat make Australia safer?

Is been five years
All we need is reality
When and where ?

Reality
Is dark and gloomy
But I see so much light

Reality
Is negative and bad
But I see so much goodness

Reality
Is falsehood and deceit
But I see so much honesty

Reality
is ugly and hideous
But I see so much beauty

Reality may be changing slowly
Please try to see
Take a look together with me
— https://www.facebook.com/abdulaziz.adam.965/posts/2014620278803207

Bring all refugees and asylum seekers from Manus and Nauru to safety and freedom now.

Take me out of fences and bars

Dear Prime Minister,

I (a manus refugee) want to share my feeling with lovely people of Australia.

I did not decide to flee my country and family but the war and situation force me to leave my country. I have known a humanitarian country called Australia which gave safety to oppressed and coerced people like me in past.

Not in my case Australian Government give me five and continue years of imprisonment for seeking asylum, unaccountable torture, suffering, wounds and cries, deaths of my friends.

I live a life where system kill my every day every hour every minutes while my same boat people released in Australian community since 2013. Two years before I got positive refugee status am still in detention.

Tomorrow 2018 will start. I am begging for mercies. Let me and people like me on Manus, go.

Take me out of fences and bars......
— A Manus refugee

Prime Minister, I beg you, let this man go. Let all the refugees detained on Manus and Nauru go to safety and freedom.

Federal Cabinet can free refugees at any time

Dear Prime Minister,

The Australian government’s determination that the refugees residing on Manus and Nauru never come to Australia and its inability to find other homes for all of them has created what one MP calls an “intractable problem”. There are many intractable problems in international affairs but this is most certainly not one of them. The solution is a straightforward one and entirely within the authority of the federal cabinet to implement. It is high time it did so.
— Jenny Hayward-Jones, http://www.internationalaffairs.org.au/australianoutlook/australia-refugee-2017/

Bring all refugees on Manus and Nauru to freedom and safety now.

As you have done it to the least of these

Dear Prime Minister,

37 Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink? 38 When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee? 39 Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? 40 And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me. 41 Then shall he say also unto them on the left hand, Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels: 42 For I was an hungred, and ye gave me no meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink: 43 I was a stranger, and ye took me not in: naked, and ye clothed me not: sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not.
— Matthew 25:40, King James Bible

Amnesty now for all refugees and asylum seekers on Manus and Nauru. Bring them to safety and freedom now.

25 are free. 903 remain

Dear Prime Minister,

Twenty five of the 928 men on Manus Island flew to USA today. PNG's deadline for closing Manus RPC is 31 October. It is urgent that Australia provides safety, freedom and rehabilitation for the detainees after 4 years in 'Manus hell.'

How will you guarantee that, Prime Minister?

Fifty of 2000 accepted to USA

Dear Prime Minister,

What support and assistance is Australia giving to the refugees who have been told that they have been accepted to the US? What about the many others who have not been offered asylum? Why have the offers from countries such as Denmark been blocked by Australia?

Australia has had more than 4 years to process the claims and resettle the asylum seekers from Manus Island and Nauru. We have had 18 months since PNG found the Manus RPC to be illegal. Every additional day compounds the suffering. Give amnesty now to all detainees on Manus and Nauru and bring them to safety and freedom.

End offshore detention.

Dear Prime Minister,

Today was the 15th day of peaceful protest by refugees on Manus Island. Imran Mohammad has published a new article on the refugees' plight. He reminds us that:

The cave that we have been stuck in for over four years is beyond an ordinary person’s comprehension because their minds have never come across of the type of sufferings that we face on a daily basis on Manus Island.
— Imran Mohammad, Manus Island

We cause this suffering. Yet there is no end in sight. Why, Prime Minister? Why do we force these people to suffer? As Imran says:

An asylum seeker and a refugee is a real person, with a real body, a real heart and a real consciousness. We are as human as you are. Regardless of how we have been introduced to you all, we are just asking for safety. Please raise your voice in hopes that a long term solution can be found for our lives soon instead of abandoning us here with no hope, help and future.
— Imran Mohammad

Bring all the asylum seekers and refugees from Manus Island and Nauru to safety and freedom.

All living creatures feel the meaning of freedom

Dear Prime Minister,

On 6 July 2017, Surena Mirzaei, a refugee illegally detained by Australia on Manus Island wrote:

Trying of caterpillar to come out of cocoon.
All living creatures feel the meaning of freedom.
All of them try to get it.
What about human?
Human has high level between living creatures.
Human has morality.
For which reason, for what logic , a human must be in detention?
— Surena Mirzaei

He accompanied his poem with this video:

Prime Minister, how do you answer?

Bring the refugees on Manus Island and Nauru here.

End offshore detention #242

Dear Prime Minister,

In the forward to "They Cannot Take the Sky", Christos Tsiolkas quotes Hani (one of the contributors to the book)

I realised that freedom ... means to be free mentally and physically
— Hani

and he asks

Chained to policies that we all know in our hearts to be destructive and inhuman, can it be said that we Australians are truly free?
... think of what our country could be if [we] had not had such stupid laws
— Christos Tsiolkas

Why have you settled for such a diminished idea of our country, Prime Minister?

For the 162nd man on Manus island

Dear Prime Minister,

‘I need my freedom’: a message from  a detainee on Manus Island .  Photograph: David T Young/ Penny Ryan

‘I need my freedom’: a message from a detainee on Manus Island.

Photograph: David T Young/Penny Ryan

On behalf of the 162nd man we continue to imprison and torture on Manus Island since July 2013, and all his fellow detainees, this is the message he wrote to Australia for Penny Ryan's 'The Confined Hearts Project':

I care about Aus just I need my freedom
— https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/gallery/2016/dec/07/we-are-still-suffering-detainees-on-manus-and-nauru-speak-in-pictures#img-22

For the 140th man on Manus Island

Dear Prime Minister,

One of 1,468 ceramic hearts from Penny Ryan’s  Confined Hearts  project, made by volunteers and inscribed with their messages. Photograph: David T Young

One of 1,468 ceramic hearts from Penny Ryan’s Confined Hearts project, made by volunteers and inscribed with their messages. Photograph: David T Young

Freedom. Manus and Nauru.

Bring them here

For the 130th man on Manus Island

On behalf of the 130th man on Manus Island, I present a second artwork of Mr Sha Sarwari. "Silent Conversation" is an installation of 1975 blank postcards. It was exhibited at Walker Street Gallery in Melbourne where it was awarded the national Home and Art prize. 

Hazara refugee Sha Sarwari with his floor-based installation Silent Conversation, featuring 1,975 blank postcards. Photograph: Michael Cranfield

Hazara refugee Sha Sarwari with his floor-based installation Silent Conversation, featuring 1,975 blank postcards. Photograph: Michael Cranfield

In the course of developing the artwork Mr Sarwari reflected on the meaning of seeking asylum when he was told by another Australian that "we welcome refugees but they should stay in their home country and build their own country ... it should not always be an option to leave, to run away." Mr Sarwari's response is:

But I don’t call it ‘running away’. By leaving, I say no to war, no to killing, no to destruction.
I think violence and fighting and killing will get you nowhere. It will keep going and going, especially where I come from, where the basic infrastructure of life in terms of values and the fabric of society is broken.
If I was back home, let’s say, to stay as that person said, to protect my life, I would be killed or kill someone. To me, not doing that is a contribution towards peace.
By leaving the country, I think all refugees, they’re not only seeking peace and protection. They are contributing towards peace and freedom.
— https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/jul/14/sha-sarwari-australia-refugee-artists-blank-postcards-attitudes-asylum-seekers

Mr Turnbull, Australia needs these people who are committed to contributing towards peace and freedom. Close offshore detention and bring the refugees on Manus Island and Nauru here.

Letters to Tyranny #20

Dear Prime Minister

I am writing to you about the twentieth asylum seeker on Manus Island. He is Mr Behrouz Boochani, a journalist from Iran, who despite having been found to be a refugee has been detained on Manus Island for three years. Mr Boochani is a very brave man. He allows his name to be published even while he is in a vulnerable and insecure position. "We want to know when exactly we will get freedom and where we will go."

Can you work with the Labor opposition and the government of Papua New Guinea to provide Mr Boochani and the men on Manus Island with immediate plans to resettle them in Australia?

Yours faithfully

Ruth Halbert

Letters to Tyranny #14

Dear Prime Minister,

Mr XXX XXX, aged XX, left XXX XX years ago and eventually was the fourteenth incarcerated on Manus Island. He has spent a significant part of his life struggling towards a goal that is so common as to be unremarkable. To be able to live.

Mr Turnbull, as the highest elected official in Australia you have achieved a prodigious series of goals. What is it in you that cannot allow Mr XXX the simplest of goals: a life?

Yours faithfully

Ruth Halbert